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Atwood's Suggestive enquiry - 1850 edition
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Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Sun Jan 30th, 2011 11:09 am
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Does anyone have access to this, or to a photocopy of the title page?

I am trying to determine whether the publisher's name is give as Trelawny Saunders (BL catalogue), or as Trelawney Saunders (many other bibliographies and references to the book).

MTIA

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sun Jan 30th, 2011 12:52 pm
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Alan Pritchard wrote:
Does anyone have access to this, or to a photocopy of the title page?

I am trying to determine whether the publisher's name is give as Trelawny Saunders (BL catalogue), or as Trelawney Saunders (many other bibliographies and references to the book).

MTIA


Found this:

http://openlibrary.org/books/OL24342387M/A_suggestive_inquiry_into_the_hermetic_mystery

Please note: inquiry not enquiry.

Last edited on Sun Jan 30th, 2011 12:55 pm by Paul Ferguson

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Sat Feb 12th, 2011 10:25 am
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Thanks for that, Paul.

And the 'read online' link from that record was also useful.

It is interesting. There seems to be a lot of confusion as to the correct version of Saunders' name. He originally set up as a map bookseller and employed Edward Stanford, who after a while was a partner of Saunders and then set up on his own.

I have now queried the entries in the BL catalogue with BL. Originally most of them had been transcribed as Trelawny (no second 'e'). They have checked them all and it seems as though only 2 out of around 20 have this name in the imprint. All the rest use Trelawney.

The records have been corrected.

Alan

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sat Feb 12th, 2011 10:55 am
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Interesting link about Saunders the map publisher here:

http://www.motco.com/map/81006/Hyde.asp

But Stanfords (still in business) spell his name Trelawney:

http://www.stanfords.co.uk/info/company-history,14,GP.html

And here's another of his books with the -ey spelling on the title-page:

http://www.rookebooks.com/product?prod_id=11764

A Google search for 'And shall Trelawn(e)y die?' reveals an equally confusing situation:

9380 -y
13900 -ey

The -eys have it!

It would seem that the famous Cornish family derive their name from the village of Trelawne [sic]:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Jonathan_Trelawny,_3rd_Baronet

Last edited on Sat Feb 12th, 2011 11:05 am by Paul Ferguson

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Sat Feb 12th, 2011 11:08 am
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I was going by the web page on the history of Standfords which you cited.

And it does seem clear that most of the BL books have 'ey'. Curious, though, that two books came through with the 'y' version.

Perhaps even at this late stage (1850s) the spelling of names was still flexible - although not as flexible as in the 17th century?

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sat Feb 12th, 2011 11:13 am
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And let's not forget Sybill Trelawney, Professor of Divination at Hogwarts.

Attachment: sybill.jpg (Downloaded 595 times)

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Sat Feb 12th, 2011 01:59 pm
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!!!

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Fri Jun 10th, 2011 04:06 am
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.

Looks like Jung’s copy of the Enchiridion physicæ (d’Espagnet) comes from the library of A. Th. Atwood. Ex-libris (well, label) on [p.2] and signature dated 1859 on [p.4] :

 

 

http://www.e-rara.ch/cgj/alch/content/pageview/1685758

 

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Tom Willard
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 Posted: Sat Jun 11th, 2011 05:54 am
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The important inscription is "AT & M Atwood 1859." Mary Anne Atwood, author of "A Suggestive Inquiry into the Hermetic Mystery" (1850; 2nd ed. 1918) married Alban Thomas Atwood, vicar of a rural church in Yorkshire, in 1859. (This according to W. L. Wilmhurst's Introduction in the 1920 edition.)I wonder whether either bookplate covers that of her father, Thomas South.

It's odd that Jung did not cite this beautiful edition. He rather cited the major tracts of Jean d'Espagnet in the "Bibliotheca Chemica Curiosa." Passages he cited include paragraphs 42, 46, 48, 73, and 137 in the "Enchiridion Physicae Restitutae."

Last edited on Sat Jun 11th, 2011 05:59 am by Tom Willard


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