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Brummet / Sanguis Naturae
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Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Sun Dec 12th, 2010 07:19 pm
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Now trying to get my head around the confusion that seems to exist about the authorship of Sanguis Naturae (by Anonymous von Schwartzfus)

Most sources (e.g Wing, Neville, pssibly Neu) say that this is actually by Christopher Brummet (or sometimes Grummet), but Duveen says nothing to do with him (see Duveen 104 for Brummet, and Duveen 539 for Anonymous von Schwartzfus, where he says "This has been attributed to Brummet, but it definitely has nothing to do with his Blut der Natur"

Is Duveen correct? Such a positive negative statement would seem to be based upon something. Has everyone else just been going by the identical titles?

Has anyone here looked at the German and English books together?

Alan

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sun Dec 12th, 2010 08:00 pm
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Both Blut der Natur and Sanguis Naturae are available on Google Books:

http://books.google.com/books?id=QaI_AAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22das+blut+der+natur%22&source=bl&ots=OXScckaQPK&sig=_g2HU2QPP1xmxYP2WNBDwiyThOY&hl=en&ei=aigFTc2QLsaYhQe1otDtBw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBUQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false


http://books.google.com/books?id=jGYUAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA282&dq=%22sanguis+naturae%22&hl=en&ei=5igFTcXRK8mBOp6D0aYB&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22sanguis%20naturae%22&f=false

Definitely not even versions of each other. As to who wrote the English text I've no idea but will keep investigating.

Now this source suggests that his name was actually Grummet and that Brummet is a simple misreading:

"Christoph Grummet, ein deutscher Chymicus (Jöcher), liefs 1677 in
'Dresden, in Verlegung des Autoris' eine Schrift 'Das Blut der Natur'
erscheinen. Auf dem Titelblatte steht: Von Christoph Grummeten; aber
das G ist von einer so vertrackten Form, dass jeder Unbefangene un-
bedenklich Brummeten lesen würde."

In: http://www.archive.org/stream/zentralblattfr23leipuoft/zentralblattfr23leipuoft_djvu.txt

Certainly "Christoph Grummet" seems to give the most hits on Google. He was, I believe, Kunckel's lab technician in Dresden and fell out with him over the question of ruby glass.

To complicate matters still further, this article from the Royal Society Notes seems to attribute Sanguis Naturae to P. De Loutherbury (i.e. De Loutherbourg) but surely the alchemical De Loutherbury is much later, or am I simply misreading it? See footnote 26.

Last edited on Sun Dec 12th, 2010 08:28 pm by Paul Ferguson

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Wed Dec 15th, 2010 11:15 am
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Thanks, Paul.

I had a copy of Das Blut, but did not want to have to wade through German Fraktur, if I could avoid it!!

Thanks for the RS reference. I did not have it, as it was primarily astrological, but will follow it up.

Loutherbourg seems to have been associated with the Phildelphians

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Wed Dec 15th, 2010 11:48 am
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Sorry, missed the link out!

http://rsnr.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/62/3/271.full



Just noticed this:

"Sanguis naturæ, or, a Manifest Declaration of the sanguine and solar congealed liquor of Nature. By Anonimus.
London: Printed for A.R. and sold by T. Sowle, in White-Hart-Court in Grace-Church-street. 1696."

and:

"[H1446]
__ [Another copy.] (Note in Newton's hand inserted: 'Sanguis Naturæ, at Sowles [the bookseller] a Quaker Widdow in White Hart Court at ye upper end of Lombard Street'; many signs of dog-earing.) Memorial Library, University of Wisconsin-Madison."
http://www.newtonproject.sussex.ac.uk/prism.php?id=88

and

http://books.google.com/books?id=3ngEugMMa9YC&pg=PA531&lpg=PA531&dq=stacey+sowles&source=bl&ots=rBaoR8nPqS&sig=h8bcuNuRoW79havFdFcJMPGbasY&hl=en&ei=BqwITeyHKcOGhQeBtPC_AQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=stacey%20sowles&f=false

('Sowles' must be an error here)

So another Quaker/alchemical link!

Last edited on Wed Dec 15th, 2010 11:55 am by Paul Ferguson

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Wed Dec 15th, 2010 12:08 pm
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No problem. I found it on the Internet.

You are right, the name is Sowle, but her name was not Stacey (Never at rest), but Tace (or Tacy) (as the imprint T. Sowle). According to BBTI, she was a printer and bookseller b. 1665 or 1666 d. 1749.
Notes: Daughter of Andrew & Jane Sowle. born 29.3.1666, d.1.11.1749.

Even more Quaker links. She published a lot of Penn's works and a lot of other Quaker works (as did her father)

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Wed Dec 15th, 2010 12:42 pm
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Alan Pritchard wrote:
No problem. I found it on the Internet.

You are right, the name is Sowle, but her name was not Stacey (Never at rest), but Tace (or Tacy) (as the imprint T. Sowle). According to BBTI, she was a printer and bookseller b. 1665 or 1666 d. 1749.
Notes: Daughter of Andrew & Jane Sowle. born 29.3.1666, d.1.11.1749.

Even more Quaker links. She published a lot of Penn's works and a lot of other Quaker works (as did her father)


Thanks. Interesting article here:

http://www.sole.org.uk/printing.htm

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Sun Dec 19th, 2010 02:15 pm
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Thanks, Paul.

The article was very interesting.

Alan

Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Mon Dec 20th, 2010 07:20 pm
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Paul,

I passed that reference to Sowle onto Dr Maureen Bell at the British Book Trade Index at Birmingham University.
She had not seen the article before, and found it useful.

In turn she is going to pass on some information to Maureen Storey. "I must write to Ms Storey and give her the info she needs about Andrew Sowle's father (which is in the Stationers' apprenticeship records). There are a few other details she might be interested in, too, which I'll email to her."

And so the wheel turns!

Thank you.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Mar 10th, 2014 08:12 pm
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Alan Pritchard wrote:
Thanks, Paul.

I had a copy of Das Blut, but did not want to have to wade through German Fraktur, if I could avoid it!!

Thanks for the RS reference. I did not have it, as it was primarily astrological, but will follow it up.

Loutherbourg seems to have been associated with the Phildelphians


Interesting blog about him here:

"For Philippe Jacques de Loutherbourg in particular, art and occultism were fundamentally joined at the level of craft. Unwilling to conceive of his practice as anything other than inherently mystical, he had, since his earliest days as a student in Strasbourg, combined his studies in painting with alchemical research to such an extent that he credited alchemy with leading him to discover a new way of fixing and enhancing pigments that would become the central element of his noted facility with color. The language of color was an important part of alchemical study, and Loutherbourg made himself its master, filling his paintings with its imagery, illuminating his canvases with creative and destructive flames, the subtle arcana of the magic world he felt inhabited his art."

http://www.laphamsquarterly.org/biography/stage-light.php?page=all


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