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Another title page Greek transliteration
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Alan Pritchard
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 Posted: Thu Aug 5th, 2010 10:37 am
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Thanks, Adam

Note though that he has the Greek transcribed wrongly - Palmibios, rather than Palimbios.

And he has missed out a chunk of text after "scurrilous libel" up to "the possibility"

Joao Baptista
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 Posted: Tue Aug 24th, 2010 10:52 am
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Hello,

I am a new member of this forum and I thought it would be useful to participate on this topic, since I study Ancient Greek and Latin in the University of Coimbra.

That final shape is an abbreviation of «-ος». It was so common to write with abbreviations before the press, that when it appeared texts still had them (wich was useful for saving space too). In latin texts the use of abbreviations eventually ceased (cf. Atalanta fugiens, for example). In greek printed texts the use of abbreviations continued at least until the XVIIIth century (for I have already seen a greek prayers book of that time, wich was impossible to read unless you knew the symbols).

The «ϐ», known as curled beta, is just another design for the letter. However, you can only use it in the middle of the word, in the beginning or end you must use the standart one. Of course you can always use the standart one in any place. For example, I think the Loeb Editions of classical texts use only the standart one, but the Éditions Belles Lettres use the curled one, when it is possible.

So that makes it «παλίμβιος», an adjectiv, that appear in the Liddell & Scott Greek Lexikon (the best one I think) as «living again». So it makes something like «Penotus living again».

And now the question... As I could see by the comments, Bernardus Penotus is the writer, is Penotus a latinized form of the real name, as Raymundus Lullus is for Ramón Llull?

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Aug 24th, 2010 01:39 pm
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Joao Baptista wrote:
Hello,

I am a new member of this forum and I thought it would be useful to participate on this topic, since I study Ancient Greek and Latin in the University of Coimbra.

That final shape is an abbreviation of «-ος». It was so common to write with abbreviations before the press, that when it appeared texts still had them (wich was useful for saving space too). In latin texts the use of abbreviations eventually ceased (cf. Atalanta fugiens, for example). In greek printed texts the use of abbreviations continued at least until the XVIIIth century (for I have already seen a greek prayers book of that time, wich was impossible to read unless you knew the symbols).

The «ϐ», known as curled beta, is just another design for the letter. However, you can only use it in the middle of the word, in the beginning or end you must use the standart one. Of course you can always use the standart one in any place. For example, I think the Loeb Editions of classical texts use only the standart one, but the Éditions Belles Lettres use the curled one, when it is possible.

So that makes it «παλίμβιος», an adjectiv, that appear in the Liddell & Scott Greek Lexikon (the best one I think) as «living again». So it makes something like «Penotus living again».

And now the question... As I could see by the comments, Bernardus Penotus is the writer, is Penotus a latinized form of the real name, as Raymundus Lullus is for Ramón Llull?



Hi João,

Bem-vindo ao Fórum.

Yes, his 'real' name was Bernard Georges Penot.

Last edited on Wed Aug 25th, 2010 07:27 am by Paul Ferguson

Neil J Mann
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 Posted: Fri Oct 8th, 2010 09:34 am
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I'm coming to this a little late, but posting now for future reference. Some of the ligatures used in Renaissance Greek printing verge on the indecipherable to us now, but this computer font gives a useful list of composite and rarer Renaissance forms--note character 163 for the beta and 217 for the omicron sigma character:
http://schmidhauser.us/tools/rgl/rgreekl2.pdf

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Dec 30th, 2016 02:53 pm
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Ingram's article on Greek ligatures now seems to be in the public domain:


http://www.grailheart.com/media/languages/GreekLigatures.pdf


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