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Julius Camillus
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Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Sun Jun 13th, 2010 04:50 am
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In this excerpt dealing with the topic of alchemy, most sarcastic in tone, of Something New, a late-ish XVIIIth century miscellanea ( ‘an humorous and witty little Book’) by ‘Automathes’, pseud. of Richard Griffith,  a reference is made to “that great chymist, Julius Camillus”.

 

http://books.google.ca/books?id=Sl0DAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA69&lpg=PA69&dq=julius+camillus+chymist&source=bl&ots=ZFF9XLrjyk&sig=dSiXZo0d_I7lR9TUmU8n67tW5CM&hl=en&ei=JE8UTKeEFMH58AackdWsCg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBcQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=julius%20camillus%20chymist&f=false

 

“But these are puerile works, or mere apprentice essays, to the manly and masterly operations of that great chymist Julius Camillus, who outdid Nature herself; for he made man and woman at once, and she can only make boys and girls. Several writers, particularly Amatus Lusitanus, affirm that they have seen his phials full of these homunculi, or Lilliputian productions, compleat in all their parts; and the great Paracelsus was so physically convinced of the certainty of the  art, that in his treatise, De rerum naturâ, he gives you the entire process of performing these mannikins.”

 

See also the footnote No.1 of this page :

http://books.google.ca/books?id=i6UJAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA2&dq=JULIUS+CAMILLUS+CHIMIE&cd=1#v=onepage&q=JULIUS%20CAMILLUS%20CHIMIE&f=false

 

Borel (ed. Heidelberg, 1656, p.126) has an item whose description put a ‘Leonard Camillus’ alongside Paracelse, Lulle and Mylius; but I'm not sure it's the same person.

 

So, who was that Julius Camillus (the chymist, not the Ist century magistrate) ?

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Last edited on Sun Jun 13th, 2010 04:54 am by Carl Lavoie

Alexander Guthrie Stewart
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 Posted: Sun Jun 13th, 2010 11:11 am
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I've had a look in Thorndike, and volume 6. page 431 has a mention of a Giulio Camillo, in an Italian work  by Pietro Pasi printed in 1614:

"Rasis and Giulio Camillo for the artificial production of human beings"

Whether this is the same Giullio Camillo who created the memory theatre:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giulio_Camillo

I have no idea. 
My understanding is that Giulio is the Italian equivalent of Julius. 

Last edited on Sun Jun 13th, 2010 11:13 am by Alexander Guthrie Stewart

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sun Jun 13th, 2010 11:42 am
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Alexander Guthrie Stewart wrote:

Whether this is the same Giullio Camillo who created the memory theatre:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giulio_Camillo

I have no idea. 


Yes, I believe it is the same person. He was also known as Giulio Camillo Delminio.

Two interesting articles about him by Glasgow University's Kate Robinson here:

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/2005HisSc..43..321R

http://www.seedbed.net/WPower&Persuasion.htm

His complete works in Italian in the Giolito de Ferrari edition can be downloaded here as pdfs:

http://books.google.com/books?id=-OQlcd6770gC&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22camillo+delminio%22&hl=en&ei=xeoUTIbBA8iJ4gaRq9HWDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFMQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q&f=false

http://books.google.com/books?id=4g88AAAAcAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22camillo+delminio%22&hl=en&ei=xeoUTIbBA8iJ4gaRq9HWDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCsQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

Last edited on Sun Jun 13th, 2010 02:37 pm by Paul Ferguson

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Mon Jun 14th, 2010 04:35 am
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Merci messieurs. Yes, that must be this one. Lusitano, who spell the name here with only one ‘L’, is quoted with a vague reference, but I’ll try to find a confirmation in his works.

Amatus Lusitanus, as quoted by Blumenbach, gravely mentions, as an established and well known fact, that a human fœtus had been actually produced by the chymical art, although it died as soon as taken out of the bottle. “Certo scimus,” says he, “chemico artificio puerum conflatum esse, et sua omnia membra perfecta contraxisse, ac motum habuisse; qui cum a vase ubi continebatur, extractus esset, moveri desiit. Novit hæc accuratius Julius Camilus, vir singularis doctrine, et rerum occultarum et variarum, magnus scrutator,” &c. &c.

 

http://books.google.ca/books?id=DLgEAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA348&dq=Julius+Camilus,&hl=en&ei=5KAVTLPOOYT58AaspLm1Cg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CCwQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Julius%20Camilus%2C&f=false

 

By the way, Lusitano’s testimony regarding homunculi is simply lifted straight from the Book IV of Rousseau’s Émile (1762, here from the 1808 edition.)

 

 





................................................

P.S.: Rafał, from the Index Librorum Prohibitorum of 1835, col. 1103-4 :

Lusitanus  Amatus.  Curationum medicinalium Centuriæ.  Donec expurgentur. (App.Ind. Trid.)

Certainly for his theories on anatomy.

 

Last edited on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 04:39 am by Carl Lavoie

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Wed Feb 19th, 2014 01:22 am
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The [160] ‘Seals of the Philosophers’ of Stolcius, (later reprinted in Mylius’ Opus medico-chymicum), with the mottoes and epigrams translated into French.

Maybe we will know someday who was this Monsieur de D* T*.




From the catalogue R. Chamonal, Livres anciens – Varia, printemps 2005, p.42, No. 203.
---------------------

P.S.: As the second picture of the previous post seems no longer to be visible, I paste it again here. Adam, if you can move it, great.


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Last edited on Wed Feb 19th, 2014 01:41 am by Carl Lavoie

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Wed Feb 19th, 2014 05:37 am
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Carl Lavoie wrote:
.
The [160] ‘Seals of the Philosophers’ of Stolcius, (later reprinted in Mylius’ Opus medico-chymicum), with the mottoes and epigrams translated into French.

Maybe we will know someday who was this Monsieur de D* T*.


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Surely Madame D. T., Carl? Or "Madame de T" perhaps?

ABRÉVIATION, s. m. [Abrévi-a-cion; en vers ci-on. 2e. é fer.] Manière d'écrire un mot, en retranchant quelques-unes des lettres, comme, Mr., Mde., Mgr., pour Monsieur, Madame, Monseigneur, etc. etc.

Jean-François Féraud: Dictionaire critique de la langue française (Marseille, Mossy 1787-1788)

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Wed Feb 19th, 2014 01:23 pm
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.

Right Paul, the XVIIIth c. form would be Mde. instead of Mme.

So Madame D* T*.

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