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Alchemy discussion forum > Bibliography > Articles on alchemy > Brief history of alchemy in Hungary (in Hungarian)

Brief history of alchemy in Hungary (in Hungarian)
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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Apr 23rd, 2010 01:08 pm
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Free downloadable .pdf:

http://www.tankonyvtar.hu/site/upload/pdf/b46.pdf

This is actually a history of chemistry in Hungary but the early chapters deal with alchemy. Lots of illustrations at the end of the text. Hungarian text.

NOT a bootleg, as this site is run by the Hungarian Ministry of Culture.

adammclean
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 03:59 pm
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Unfortunately, I could not get this to open inside Firefox and thus use Google Translate to try and read it. It could be an interesting summary.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 05:14 pm
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adammclean wrote:
Unfortunately, I could not get this to open inside Firefox and thus use Google Translate to try and read it. It could be an interesting summary.


The historian of science Lászlo Szathmáry (pictured) published the standard work, Magyar Alkémisták (Hungarian Alchemists), in 1928.

This was reprinted in 1986:

http://www.aukcio.ittvettem.hu/szathmary-laszlo---magyar-alkemistak--reprint-4831931.html

Attached Image (viewed 798 times):

szathmar.jpg

Last edited on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 05:19 pm by Paul Ferguson

adammclean
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 05:29 pm
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What a wonderful emblem on that book's cover. It makes me want to buy it to see its source.

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Laszlo_cover.jpg

Last edited on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:43 pm by adammclean

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 05:55 pm
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Latin inscription at the bottom says 'Mons Magnesiae'.

I think it must be from Lippay's Mons Magnesiae:

http://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lippay_Gy%C3%B6rgy

This MS is in the Austrian National Library, MS 11280.

Last edited on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:08 pm by Paul Ferguson

adammclean
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:03 pm
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I suppose this is the

Mons Magnesiae Quo Ex Obscurum sed verum et Subjectum Philosophorum effonditur Express denominatur

in the National Library of Austria in Vienna. I do not know that work. This is something to investigate further.

Last edited on Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:04 pm by adammclean

adammclean
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:16 pm
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According to the Austrian National Library catalogue this is a manuscript of 20 leaves with an illuminated title page. I must try and get a copy of that image.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Apr 26th, 2010 06:18 pm
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adammclean wrote:
I suppose this is the

Mons Magnesiae Quo Ex Obscurum sed verum et Subjectum Philosophorum effonditur Express denominatur

in the National Library of Austria in Vienna. I do not know that work. This is something to investigate further.


See here:

http://books.google.com/books?id=1QXiWBGboHMC&pg=PA379&dq=%22lippay%22+mons&hl=en&ei=0NjVS4fBDYjb-Qb6y-SUDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CEgQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%22lippay%22%20mons&f=false

including footnote 86.

I wonder if it was his 'insignificant artist-nephew' who painted the emblem?

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Lippay.jpg

Last edited on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 03:05 am by Paul Ferguson

adammclean
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 Posted: Tue Apr 27th, 2010 08:21 am
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The emblem is, of course, based on the engraving for Maria the Jewess from Maier Symbola aurea mensae, Franckfurt, 1617.

Last edited on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 08:35 am by adammclean

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Apr 27th, 2010 12:30 pm
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adammclean wrote:
The emblem is, of course, based on the engraving for Maria the Jewess from Maier Symbola aurea mensae, Franckfurt, 1617.

This one.

Interestingly, Lippay's grave has just been discovered (Juraj is the Slovakian form of György):

“Only a few weeks ago we managed to find his grave and to definitely identify the remains as Peter Pázmány who lived from 1570 to 1637,” the spokesman said, adding that the church also now knows that Archbishop Juraj Lippay is buried next to Pázmány.

http://spectator.sme.sk/articles/view/38103/8/archbishops_grave_discovered.html

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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Apr 27th, 2010 12:56 pm
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This may not be of any relevance at all, but it would seem that Mount Sipylus in Turkey is also known as 'Mons Magnesiae':

http://books.google.com/books?id=J52L2JmI9YIC&pg=PA269&lpg=PA269&dq=%22mons+magnesiae%22&source=bl&ots=I5RN6kSJZ6&sig=LGD5yc9Afv-PYO13Aqa4Is299xA&hl=en&ei=j__WS8HUFZKrsAbm5MmJAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCIQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%22mons%20magnesiae%22&f=false

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Sipylus

Last edited on Tue Apr 27th, 2010 03:16 pm by Paul Ferguson


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