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Golden and Rosy Cross
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adammclean
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 Posted: Fri Apr 23rd, 2010 01:26 pm
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Thanks for the reference to the French Grande Loge Nationale web site.

I looked at their collection of artworks and found they had a copy of an engraving I saw many years ago, which I would dearly love to have a high resoution scan of large photograph of.

http://www.glnf-musee.fr/matrice.asp?ARB_N_ID=33&COL_N_ID=779&collection=Le%20Miroir%20de%20la%20Sagesse#


Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Fri Apr 23rd, 2010 05:16 pm
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They seem to have some fabulous stuff. Look at this painting here by Louis Huet:

http://www.glnf-musee.fr/matrice.asp?ARB_N_ID=33&COL_N_ID=221&collection=Sc%E8ne%20ma%E7onnique,%20tableau%20de%20Louis%20Huet

 

Yes. I suspect Bellini’s Sacred Allegory, though (now in les Offices), with its ‘theatrical’ composition and its contrast architecture/nature, to have been the model, or say, a strong influence for several of these Masonic scenes.

 

http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/b/bellini/giovanni/1490-99/149alle.html

 

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Apr 23rd, 2010 06:17 pm
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Milko Bogaard's essay 'Manifestations of the Martinist Order' contains some useful information on this subjec:

http://omeganexusonline.net/rcmo/martinistorders.htm

See the section "Ordine Martinista Napolitano" for more about Baron Tsch(o)udy.

See the section "Russian Martinism" for Novikov (mentioned in another thread under "New Books").

There are many references to alchemy in this essay - search the page for "alch"

Johann Plattner
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 Posted: Tue May 4th, 2010 07:58 pm
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adammclean wrote: Paul Ferguson wrote: There is a specialised study of Schröder by Stefan Redies:

Which, sadly, appears to be unavailable.

I could have a look to  that book from Stefan Redies and it doesn't mention any manuscripts which could be linked to the Gold und Rosenkreuzer of that period of time at all.


Rafal T. Prinke
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 09:56 pm
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I have just found out about two books that may be relevant to this old thread -- and wonder if anyone has seen them and can say a few words about the contents. The "La magie" is apparently by Madathanus [=Mynsicht] and contains some 150 magical sigils -- from a Czech manuscript.


Dánann, Alexandre de. Un Rose-Croix méconnu entre le XVIIe et le XVIIIe siècles Federico Gualdi ou Auguste Melech Hultazob Prince d’Achem. Avec de nombreux textes et documents rares et inédits pour servir à une histoire de la Rose-Croix d’Or, Itinéraires, 13. Milano: Éditions Arché, 2006.


Dánann, Alexandre de. La magie de la Rose-Croix d'Or: Traduction de "La Croix d'or ou Bréviaire de la Confrérie de la Rose-croix d'or" dans le seul manuscrit connu du XVIIe siècle avec ses psaumes et caractères magiques, une introduction sur l'origine de la confrérie et la traduction intégrale de ses statuts (1678), Acacia, 13. Milano: Éditions Arché, 2009.


Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 10:40 pm
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Rafal T. Prinke wrote:
I have just found out about two books that may be relevant to this old thread -- and wonder if anyone has seen them and can say a few words about the contents. The "La magie" is apparently by Madathanus [=Mynsicht] and contains some 150 magical sigils -- from a Czech manuscript.


Dánann, Alexandre de. Un Rose-Croix méconnu entre le XVIIe et le XVIIIe siècles Federico Gualdi ou Auguste Melech Hultazob Prince d’Achem. Avec de nombreux textes et documents rares et inédits pour servir à une histoire de la Rose-Croix d’Or, Itinéraires, 13. Milano: Éditions Arché, 2006.


Dánann, Alexandre de. La magie de la Rose-Croix d'Or: Traduction de "La Croix d'or ou Bréviaire de la Confrérie de la Rose-croix d'or" dans le seul manuscrit connu du XVIIe siècle avec ses psaumes et caractères magiques, une introduction sur l'origine de la confrérie et la traduction intégrale de ses statuts (1678), Acacia, 13. Milano: Éditions Arché, 2009.




Hi Rafal,

I don't actually have the books but I can tell you that Alexandre de Dánann is the nom de plume of two Italian researchers, Alessandro Boella and Antonella Galli.

Website here but the English pages are under construction:
http://www.alexandrededanann.net/

This is what the blurb for their Mynsicht book has to say (in my free translation):

"Alexandre de Dánann has undertaken researches into the original Fraternitas Aureæ et Roseæ Crucis (which should not be confused with the 9-degree system known as the Order of the Golden and Rosy Cross of the Old System). He continues his work by publishing here a previously unpublished document of quite exceptional importance: a breviary of the Brotherhood of the Golden and Rosy Cross based on the sole surviving MS, which dates from the 17th century, at the Czech National Library in Prague. Written in Latin and German, the prayers alternate with psalms, magical symbols, drawings and a hundred magical seals, one section of which is accompanied by a key in code. It has been deciphered here with the help of an elementary steganographic method using correspondence tables based on those of Trithemius, in several variants. This MS therefore confirms the use within the Golden & Rosy Cross of magic in addition to alchemy, something that the statutes from the 17th century also confirm, as do the documents establishing the genealogy of the operative texts of the Brotherhood. A substantial introduction adds new and important information and sheds light on key personalities such as Hinricus Madathanus alias Hadrianus a Mynsicht, and Johannes Augustinus Pantheus. It draws special attention to the least well-known but by no means least important personage, Giovan Battista Agnello, a Venetian physician and alchemist who knew John Dee and who helped introduce the Voarchadumia tradition (and perhaps the Rosicrucian tradition as well) to England. The appendices provide further information, and include, inter alia, the statutes of 1678 in their entirety. These prove that the Brotherhood was in existence in 1542-1543. Also included is an 18th century document attesting to common elements between the Golden & Rosy Cross and Freemasonry, as well as an exquisite little alchemical poem in code (which is also deciphered here) dating from the 17th century."

More about the Gualdi in a moment...

Rafal T. Prinke
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 11:18 pm
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Thank you, Paul. I had also found their website and while the books seem to contain valuable editions of archival documents, the statement that they prove the existence of Rosicrucians in Italy in mid-16th c. certainly lights a red lamp. Books published by Arche seem to be of good quality, though.


Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 11:19 pm
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Paul Ferguson wrote:


More about the Gualdi in a moment...


Regarding Gualdi, this is what the authors have to say about their book (again in a free translation by His Nibs):

"This is the first biographical essay dedicated to a legendary alchemist, who has almost completely escaped the attention of historical researchers: a Rosicrucian, a teacher of Cagliostro and a close friend of the Comte de Saint-Germain, he was known as Federico Gualdi, but was actually of German origin. During his long sojourn in Venice he engaged in a variety of activities. Versatile and eclectic, and multilingual, he was also an astronomer and mathematician, and in 1662 even designed a barrage for the Lagoon. He was considered an adept in possession of the "divine secret" and the elixir of life. After reaching the age of 200 (and even, allegedly, 600 years) his appearance was still that of a man of 40 – as a portrait by Titian shows. His milieu included aristocrats, scholars, artists, clergymen, Italians, French, Germans, and a smaller circle of disciples. The best known of these, Francesco Maria Santinelli, a gentleman at the court of Queen Christina of Sweden, published under the pseudonym of Marcantonio Crassellame Chinese, the "Lux obnubilata suapte natura refulgens" (1666), which was translated into French under the title "La Lumière sortant par soi-même des ténèbres". The model for this composition was the "Philosophia Hermetica" of his master Federico Gualdi, which is presented here for the first time with its variant, the "Opus Philosophicum", with a French translation of the latter. Gualdi was considered one of the leaders of the Order of the Golden and Rosy Cross, an order which was founded well before 1710 (a manuscript preserved in Naples, dated 1678, mentions its existence in Italy and Germany as early as 1542). In accordance with the statutes of the Order, he devoted himself to alchemy, familiar spirits, the creation of homunculi, and the manufacture of medicines and elixirs. He was the subject of an investigation by the Inquisition of Venice (1676), which, however, did not lead to a formal trial. Much later on he disappeared from this city, to reappear on German soil in 1716. Rare engravings of the time show him transformed into Melech Hultazob August, Prince of Achem, with all the attributes of a great lord from Eastern Europe. Famous for his universal medicine, produced in an alchemical transmutation for King Frederick Augustus II of Poland, he also met King Frederick II of Prussia and Tsar Peter the Great. He maintained a correspondence with Anna Ivanovna, Duchess of Courland and future empress of Russia. His marriage to a Polish countess however brought him to a sad end: on her orders a negro servant strangled him. Sic transit! But the story of "Gualdi" does not end there: Baron von Wächter, of the Order of the Strict Observance, was to meet his self-styled "nephew" who took part in two magical rituals. The text of the Philosophia Hermetica was also adopted for use in the highest degree of Starck's Clerical Templars... The present work also contains a detailed description of and keys to the use of various secret texts, both alchemical and magical, of the Golden and Rosy Cross, thus making accessible a literature that is notoriously difficult to access, as well as numerous rare or previously unpublished documents (accompanied by a rich iconography) which can be used to rewrite a few pages of the history of the Rosicrucians. One chapter is devoted to artificial generation and deals with the Divine Magic of the Sabaeans and the homunculi of Count Kueffstein. An extensive afterword highlights the links between Rosicrucian and Arab hermeticism, the role of the monasteries in the transmission of the hermetic and alchemical tradition, the Paracelsian origin of Rosicrucian knowledge, the fundamental distinction between the original Golden and Rosy Cross and that known as the Old System, calls into question the primacy of the Rosicrucians of Andreae, and completes a rehabilitation of Karl Kiesewetter and the manuscripts of his great-grandfather, JS Haussen, the last Imperator of the Golden and Rosy Cross. In Appendix A the reader will find a rich collection of sources in the original language, including full-texts and extensive excerpts from the alchemical-magical of Gualdi; in Appendix B, texts in French; and in C, research on a particular current in the Rosicrucian tradition, "the unknown Rosicrucian."

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 11:28 pm
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Rafal T. Prinke wrote:
Thank you, Paul. I had also found their website and while the books seem to contain valuable editions of archival documents, the statement that they prove the existence of Rosicrucians in Italy in mid-16th c. certainly lights a red lamp. Books published by Arche seem to be of good quality, though.




...and they've just published this:

https://it-it.facebook.com/events/669850366360993/?ref=22

Attached Image (viewed 387 times):

Alchimia-della-Confraternita-dell-Aurea-Rosacroce-libro.jpg

Rafal T. Prinke
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 11:28 pm
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Thanks for the second instalment, Paul. Even more interesting -- and still more difficult to believe! But even if the conclusions are wrong, the source material may still be fascinating. Maybe someone has seen the two books? Intriguingly, I do not see them quoted searching through GoogleBooks.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 11:34 pm
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Rafal T. Prinke wrote:
Thanks for the second instalment, Paul. Even more interesting -- and still more difficult to believe! But even if the conclusions are wrong, the source material may still be fascinating. Maybe someone has seen the two books? Intriguingly, I do not see them quoted searching through GoogleBooks.


They are listed here but not extracted. Maybe their lawyers read the Riot Act to Google about copyright:

http://tinyurl.com/nmn5s6p

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Mon Nov 11th, 2013 11:35 pm
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Rafal T. Prinke wrote:
Thanks for the second instalment, Paul. Even more interesting -- and still more difficult to believe! But even if the conclusions are wrong, the source material may still be fascinating. Maybe someone has seen the two books? Intriguingly, I do not see them quoted searching through GoogleBooks.


This would make a good translation series. I wonder if Adam's resources would run to it...

Rafal T. Prinke
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 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2013 10:21 am
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This is all so fascinating -- and shows how little we (or rather I) really know about the roots of the Rosicrucian "current". I have found two more references which make the whole thing look quite serious:

Barbierato, Federico, Adelisa Malena. "Rosacroce, libertini e alchimisti nella società veneta del secondo Seicento: I Cavalieri dell’Aurea e Rosa Croce " Storia d'Italia. Annali 25 (Esoterismo), (2005): 323-357.

Humbertclaude, Eric. Federico Gualdi à Venise: Fragments retrouvés (1660-1678). Recherches sur un exploitant minier alchimiste. Paris: Editions L'Harmattan, 2010.

The second one is partly visible on GoogleBooks. It seems that much of the RC history will have to be re-written (or actually is being rewritten).


Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2013 11:58 am
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Paul Ferguson wrote:
Rafal T. Prinke wrote:
Thank you, Paul. I had also found their website and while the books seem to contain valuable editions of archival documents, the statement that they prove the existence of Rosicrucians in Italy in mid-16th c. certainly lights a red lamp. Books published by Arche seem to be of good quality, though.




...and they've just published this:

https://it-it.facebook.com/events/669850366360993/?ref=22


Regarding which they say:

"This volume includes the most important parts of a document of remarkable importance: an Italian manuscript of the Golden and Rosy Cross conserved at the National Library in Naples, containing texts which reveal an advanced knowledge of the practice of alchemy within the Brotherhood, as well as the complete statutes of 1678 of the Brotherhood: the inviolable vows to be observed by the Brothers of the Golden Cross or indeed of the Golden Rose preceding the usual Profession is evidence of their existence from 1542-1543 and of the practical use of alchemy within the Brotherhood.
The German statutes of 1710 published in the appendix to the work of Samuel Richter on the authentic and complete preparation of the Philosopher's Stone of the Brotherhood of the Golden and Rosy Cross therefore turn out to be a translation, adapted to need, of the Inviolable Vows, which were not originally Protestant in tone, but which were the rules of a Catholic brotherhood of knightly origin, which it would seem was actually very tolerant towards the other Christian denominations.
Other previously unknown texts relating to the Golden and Rosy Cross are also presented here thanks to the rediscovery of an Italian Hermeticist of the 18th century, Count Francisco Onofrio da Marsciano, Lord of Orvieto and Foligno, described as an “adept without envy of others”, and above all thanks to a manuscript conserved in Vienna which provides new and important information about the Brotherhood of the Golden and Rosy Cross, described as “a most ancient society of twelve adepts”, the archaic emblem of which is shown. This emblem is a symbolic cross, for the explanation of which Marsciano refers us to a text by the Hermetic philosopher and physician from Macerata known as Ludovico Conti (who, Marsciano tells us, was himself a member of the Golden and Rosy Cross), which is contained in the Bibliotheca Chemica Curiosa: this is the draft of the appendix to a treatise on the alkahest published in 1665.
Ludovico Conti was, in fact, the author of the first published treatise dedicated specifically to the alkahest, published in Venice in 1661, which contains the same symbolic cross. Conti's interpretation of this symbolic cross, disclosed “out of love for the students of Hermetic orthochemistry and voarcadumia [sic]” is also given here.
The volume also presents for the first time: the first documents mentioning the Golden and Rosy Cross; an Italian connection to the origins of the Chemical Wedding; the Voarchadumia of Giovanni Augustin Panteo; Giovan Batiste Agnello and his relations with John and Arthur Dee; indirect evidence of the Golden and Rosy Cross in Italy in an Hermetic circle surrounding the Gonzaga, which included the Piedmontese Giacomo Antonio Gromis, Cesare della Riviera and Angelo Ingegneri; and the rediscovery of a German Brother of the Golden and Rosy Cross, Paulus Stein; it is completed by a list of texts, manuscripts and engravings which make explicit reference to the Golden and Rosy Cross.”

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Nov 12th, 2013 02:26 pm
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I do not see any specific references in this material to the Venetian Jews, who were one of the themes of Panteo's life. I wonder what influence they had on these esoteric movements and whether they provided the shot in the arm that the Renaissance humanists needed to formulate a magical and alchemical system.


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