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Golden and Rosy Cross
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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Wed Apr 14th, 2010 08:14 pm
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adammclean wrote:
I think this reference by Tilton could be a bit jumbled.
McIntosh on page 33 was referring to the Testamentum der Fraternitet Roseae et Aureae Crucis Codex 2897 in the National Library of Austria in Vienna.

Tilton on page 251 refers to a Czech manuscript dated 1761 which was discovered in Hungary in the late 19th century by Ludwig Abafi (Aigner). This was a document of a "Prager Assemblee" and was entitled Aureum Vellus seu Iunioratus Fratrum Rosae Crucis. Apparently this was in the Degh collection in the Castle of the Festetics family.
Where it is now I do not know - possibly in some public or University library in Hungary.



Bad news. It look as if the Degh collection was destroyed during World War II, presumably as part of the Nazi anti-Masonic onslaught. Fortunately the MS was summarised by Abafi in his History of Freemasonry:

"A XIX században gr. Festetics Pál dégi kastélyában összegyûjtötte és rendszerezte a szabadkõmûvesség addigi magyar történelmének iratait és levelezését. A levéltárat (104 kötet kb. 10.000 ívnyi tartalommal) többek között Abafi Lajos dolgozta fel, s adta ki a Szabadkõmûvesség története Magyarországon c. mûvét, amely a XVIII. és XIX. szd. történéseit foglalja össze. (Mivel a dégi gyûjtemény a háborúk folyamán elpusztult ezért gyakorlatilag ez maradt az egyetlen hitelesnek mondható összefoglaló mû, amely eredeti dokumentumok alapján tárja elénk a szabadkõmûvesség magyarországi történetének kezdeteit egészen az u.n. Aranykorig.)"

http://www.szabadkomuvessopron.hu/sopron/sopronszk.html

Last edited on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 11:36 am by Paul Ferguson

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Thu Apr 15th, 2010 04:20 am
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.

It might be worthwhile to check out this fellow : Friedrich Josef Wilhelm SCHRÖDER (1733-1778), professor of medicine at Marburg (not to confuse with Johann Schröder) *.


From the book-review by A. Faivre, link provided above (see p.67):

«Anyway, F. J .W. Schröeder, mentioned above, chosen and insistently requested by the Order [of the Golden Rosy-Cross], had made for the latter an active propaganda, which is hardly surprising, coming from an alchemist

 

Which somehow echoes Ferguson (II, 342-343), in its long bibliographical note, that states that: “He proclaimed himself a true Rosicrucian, though no longer in touch with the chief of the Order.” But this comment could have been tongue-in-cheek humour, as he had just reported that:

From his youth up, Schröder was of weak constitution, but at the end his health was still more impaired, partly by his chemical and alchemical experiments, partly by his overstrained phantasy inducing mental suffering, and it was said of him that ‘ he was a man whose brain was on fire with alchemy and whose passions for paradox had made him crazy.’

 

Mackey’s Encyclopaedia (revised edition of 1927, pp. 669-670) has half-a-column about him (without any reference given for this first part of the extract):

He established at Marburg, in 1766, a Chapter of True and Ancient Rose Croix Masons, and in 1779 [Sic. Probably ‘1769’ was meant, as he died in 1778.] he organized in a Lodge in Sarreburg a school or Rite, founded on magic, theosophy, and alchemy, which consisted of seven degrees, four high degrees founded on these occult sciences being super-added to the original three Symbolic degrees. This Rite, called the “Rectified Rose Croix,” was only practised by two Lodges under the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Hamburg. Clavel (Histoire Pittoresque, p.183) calls him the Cagliostro of Germany, because it was in his school that the Italian charlatan learned his first lessons of magic and theosophy. Oliver, misunderstanding Clavel, styles him an adventurer. (Landmarks, ii., 710.)  But it is perhaps more just that we should attribute to him a diseased imagination and misdirected studies than a bad heart or impure practises.

 

And yes, in the same volume, an entry ‘Rose Croix of Gold, Brethren of’, is distinct from the ‘Rose Croix, Rectified’ one.

 

........................................................................................

* : There is a digitalized MS. from a Schroeder (made by Bacstrom in 1802), but it isn’t the right guy neither:

"William, Baron Von Schröder, In Defence of Mercury. Nuremberg 1727. 8o. Translated from the German by S. B. "

(L.A., P. Getty, M. P. Hall coll., Box 18, Vol.8)

http://www.revistaazogue.com/biblio.htm#N_3_

.

Last edited on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 03:29 pm by Carl Lavoie

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Apr 15th, 2010 11:47 am
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Thanks Carl.

There is a specialised study of Schröder by Stefan Redies:

http://www.bookfinder.com/dir/i/Friedrich_Joseph_Wilhelm_Schroder_1733-1778_-Ein_Rosenkreuzer_an_Der/3897030829/

adammclean
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 Posted: Thu Apr 15th, 2010 12:18 pm
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Paul Ferguson wrote: There is a specialised study of Schröder by Stefan Redies:

Which, sadly, appears to be unavailable.

There is another work on the same theme by him which can be seen (in part) on Google books

Freimauer, Tempelritter und Rosenkreuzer: zur Geschichte der Geheimbünde in 18 Jahrhundert

Last edited on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 01:37 pm by adammclean

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Apr 15th, 2010 12:58 pm
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According to this site:

http://www.muellerscience.com/ESOTERIK/Freimaurerei_Geschichte/Hochgrade.htm

the rituals of the Gold- und Rosenkreuzer were taken over by the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia and by the "Bon Pasteur" system in Eastern Europe.

For the Bon Pasteur see:

http://www.freemasons-freemasonry.com/ruspol.html

"The name of the founder of the Lodge “Au Bon Pasteur” also deserves to live on in the mouth of posterity on account of the hard fate which Masonry brought upon him, and which he bore with patience for Masonry’s sake. Jean de Thoux de la Salverte*, military engineer at Brünn, had to pay dearly for his extraordinary zeal in the cause of Masonry by spending many years in the citadel of Spielberg near Brünn and afterwards in the fortress of Komorn to be finally banished from the country. But all these hard blows made his pet child only the dearer to him, so that as soon as he again felt settled in Poland as colonel of a regiment, he set about the foundation of a new Lodge, viz. the one just mentioned “Au Bon Pasteur.” It is, however, characteristic of the man and of his time that he renounced Masonry and left his newly won fatherland for 5 years in order “to study Alchemy and Cabbala,” and to introduce them into his Lodge."

*His name is spelled in various ways. There is an article about him in Acta Poloniae Historica:

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=12051702

"De Toux (ou Detoux, plus rarement de Thoux) de Salvert (ou de Salverte) était né aux environs de Tournai (Belgique), à l'époque aux Pays-Bas autrichiens| professeur de mathématiques, enrôlé dans l'armée habsbourgeoise en qualité d'ingénieur. Initié à Vienne| fondateur de la loge " Sternkreuz " en 1744, incarcéré, puis chassé de l'empire des Habsbourg, il se réfugie à Varsovie| il parcourut l'Europe, fondant des loges ou y adhérant. Il n'a laissé aucun exposé de sa pensée mais une intéressante correspondance. Mort en 1797, à l'âge de 90 ans environ, à Varsovie."

He is also mentioned in a slightly dodgy Wiki article:

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franc-ma%C3%A7onnerie_en_Pologne

"Le 21 septembre 1769, une Tenue Solennelle proclame la naissance de la Grande Loge du Vertueux Sarmate, qui réorganise la Grande Loge autour d'un nouveau Règlement général. Moscynski conserve la Grande Maîtrise. Le français Jean de Toux de Salvert devient Grand Maître adjoint."

The spelling Jean de Thoux de Salverte gives the most Google hits.

Last edited on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 03:37 pm by Paul Ferguson

Carl Lavoie
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 Posted: Thu Apr 15th, 2010 03:41 pm
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.

Paul,

About De Thoux, in your second excerpt, is this mention that:

Il n'a laissé aucun exposé de sa pensée mais une intéressante correspondance.

 

 

I don`t know if he would have gone as far as to pen down a (draft of a) ritual in his letters, but it would be nice.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Apr 15th, 2010 03:46 pm
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Carl Lavoie wrote:
.

Paul,

About De Thoux, in your second excerpt, is this mention that:

Il n'a laissé aucun exposé de sa pensée mais une intéressante correspondance.

 

 

I don`t know if he would have gone as far as to pen down a (draft of a) ritual in his letters, but it would be nice.



That would indeed be wonderful.

There is a brief study of him in Polish:

J. Wojtowicz, Jan Łukasz Thoux de Salverte – wolnomularz i okultysta (z dziejów wolnomularstwa polskiego epoki stanisławowskiej), [w] Francja – Polska XVIII-XIX w. Studia x dziejów kultury i polityki poświęcone Profesorowi Andrzejowi Zahorskiemu w sześćdziesiątą rocznicę urodzin, Warszawa 1983, s. 163-172).

Seems also to have been closely tied up with Falk, about whom I posted some time ago:

http://books.google.com/books?id=BXyE2uz7O-MC&pg=PA218&lpg=PA218&dq=%22de+Salverte%22+correspondence&source=bl&ots=LaIQnALnpy&sig=bvQb71rsPnKNl9uJgeQQOW_Yv8w&hl=en&ei=LyfHS6vwDN-lsQbGt4XjCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CA8Q6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=%22de%20Salverte%22%20correspondence&f=false

There is a very interesting blog here:

http://gyllenegryningen.blogspot.com/2008/10/rosicrucian-nation-of-poland.html

"As a future King Poniatowski was in fact trained and educated by two alchemists and Rosicrucians, Lucas de Toux de Salverte and the Polish Count August Moszynski. The latter probably [was] the head of the Polish branch of the Gold- ünd Rosenkreuz. With the financial support of the King, they both set up an alchemical laboratory in the Ujazdowski palace, even causing great damage to the castle when a accidental fire broke up during an alchemical experiment. According to MacIntosh Moszynski in 1768 wrote "a manuscript treatise addressed to the King entitled Réflexions sur la science hermétique". The king himself wrote several papers on the subject of alchemy. During his reign in the mid-1770s the membership of the Gold- und Rosenkreutz amassed, including nobility, officers and other dignitaries.

The Rosicrucian system of Bon Pasteur was supposedly founded in 1750 by Toux de Salverte, i.e. preceding the Gold- ünd Rosenkreutz Order of Herman Fictuld even if it shared many features with the latter. It was probably to this Order that the Polish King were initiated, as it has a degree with the title of "Chevalier Rose-Croix". Like the Gold- ünd Rosenkreutz it started off from the Scottish Master Degree, i.e. from the 5th degree and onwards to the 12th. MacIntosh notes that both the Bon Pasteur and the Gold- ünd Rosenkretuz shared "a pietistic type of Christianity with a Gnostic, dualistic colouring". Alchemical symbolism [was] prominent within both systems. They even shared many common rules, which had their origins in the document of Sincerus Renatus and the Rosicrucian group around the document D.O.M.A. That in turn [was] strikingly similar, according to MacIntosh, to another document called the Testamentum der Fraternität Roseae et Aureae Crucis. Thus MacIntosh concludes that Bon Pasteur can "be seen as a Polish offshoot of the same stream to which the Gold- und Rosenkreutz belonged"."

Mackenzie's Royal Masonic Cyclopaedia says he was:

"Founder of the Academy of Ancients at Warsaw, in 1763. A colonel in the Polish service, and a deputy to the Convention of Paris, in 1785. He was also a member of the Strict Observance, by the designation 'Eques a carcere'."

Carcer, carceris can mean the starting-barrier at a race-course as well, of course, as the more usual meaning 'jail' (De Salverte had spent time in jail for his Masonic affiliations).

Lenning, in his Allgemeines Handbuch der Freimaurerei, Vol. 3, page 379, confirms his S.O. nickname but says that the Academy he founded was called the Academy of Secrets, an echo of della Porta's "Academia Secretorum Naturae."

He is also mentioned in a paper by our very own Rafal Prinke reproduced on Adam's website:

http://www.alchemywebsite.com/sword.html

I wonder if Rafal knows of the present whereabouts of his correspondence?

Last edited on Thu Apr 15th, 2010 07:55 pm by Paul Ferguson

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Apr 16th, 2010 03:08 pm
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Paul Ferguson wrote:
According to this site:

http://www.muellerscience.com/ESOTERIK/Freimaurerei_Geschichte/Hochgrade.htm

the rituals of the Gold- und Rosenkreuzer were taken over by the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia and by the "Bon Pasteur" system in Eastern Europe.



The Third Grade (Practicus) - the 'alchemical' degree - of the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia is partially reproduced here (page 11 onwards):

http://books.google.com/books?id=p3FbN9vmxJ4C&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22Rituals+of+the+First+Four+Grades%22&hl=en&ei=cm7IS8-vMM_r-AbV-diOBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false

Last edited on Sat Apr 17th, 2010 12:37 am by Paul Ferguson

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sun Apr 18th, 2010 10:18 am
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For the D.O.M.A. (referred to in my last post but one) see Rafal Prinke's article on Adam's site:

http://www.levity.com/alchemy/lampado.html

For reproductions of the D.O.M.A. plates see:

http://www.jamesclairlewis.com/pages/metaphysics/doma.html

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sun Apr 18th, 2010 10:41 am
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Also worth investigating in this connection, it would seem, is the Chevaliers de l'Aigle Noir et Rose-Croix, which Ricker and Faucher say, on page 102 of their Histoire de Franc-Maçonnerie, was 'nothing other than a gathering of alchemists':

http://books.google.com/books?id=EBC2OUmsKXQC&pg=PA102&lpg=PA102&dq=%22Chevaliers+de+l%E2%80%99A%C3%AEgle+Noir+et+Rose-Croix%22&source=bl&ots=LVsCehszUE&sig=i06ei8kAkoKVfDva61sKO69YKoo&hl=en&ei=EdLKS5zBE9nfsAbhiYSHAw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CBMQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false

See:

http://hautsgrades.over-blog.com/article-21514611.html

"...si les Chevaliers de l'Aigle noir sont appelés Rose-Croix, c'est parce que Raymond Lulle grand maçon et philosophe hermétique, ayant trouvé par la science kabbalistique le vrai salut de vie par le mariage des six métaux, il en composa un parfait appelé or ; il le présenta au roi d'Angleterre qui en fit fabriquer de la monnaie, où d'un côté était une croix symbole des quatre éléments, et de l'autre une rose, symbole du triomphe du Travail et le prix des sages, l'épine n'appartenant qu'aux vrais trompeurs et aux sots.

Raymond Lulle fut fait chevalier et, depuis lui, tous ceux qui travaillent à la science kabbalistique ou art royal sont appelés chevaliers Rose-Croix.

Ce sublime grade est en vénération dans toutes les cours du Nord et en Prusse, où le souverain en est le protecteur et le GM C'est pour cela qu'il lui a même donné le nom d'Aigle noir comme roi des oiseaux et le seul fait pour voler au devant du soleil et en fixer la lumière."

Last edited on Sun Apr 18th, 2010 03:47 pm by Paul Ferguson

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Apr 22nd, 2010 10:01 pm
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Allow me to mention also a (now rather scarce) book by Claude Guérillot:

La rose maçonnique, Tome I

http://www.amazon.fr/rose-ma%C3%A7onnique-1-Claude-Gu%C3%A9rillot/dp/285707705X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1271969916&sr=8-1

"L'auteur a recherché les liens de filiation qui unissent entre eux les différents Grades d'Apprenti, de Compagnon et de Maître, pour ensuite nous faire découvrir les premiers rituels Écossais, aujourd'hui oubliés, tels l’ Écossais Parisien des Trois J.J.J. ou le Grand Écossais de Montpellier. Il suit l'enchaînement symbolique de l'Ancienne Maîtrise, qui deviendra, bien plus tard, les quatorze premiers Degrés du Rite Écossais Ancien et Accepté, il analyse la progression qui, du Chevalier d'Orient au Souverain Grand Inspecteur Général, complète ce Rite. Mais, aussi, il nous fait découvrir des trésors oubliés, tels que l'Ordre de l'Étoile Polaire ou le Chevalier de l'Aigle Noir, première forme alchimique du rose-croix."

Attached Image (viewed 903 times):

rose guerillot.jpg

Last edited on Thu Apr 22nd, 2010 10:02 pm by Paul Ferguson

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Apr 22nd, 2010 10:10 pm
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There is also an 18th manuscript in the library of the French Grande Loge Nationale illustrated here:

http://www.glnf-musee.fr/matrice.asp?ARB_N_ID=1&COL_N_ID=571&collection=Pr%E9cis%20des%20huit%20premiers%20grades#

The manuscript apparently contains information about the Aigle Noir degree but I do not think any of the illustrations relate directly to it.

Last edited on Thu Apr 22nd, 2010 10:24 pm by Paul Ferguson

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Apr 22nd, 2010 10:25 pm
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Anyone read this?

http://www.amazon.fr/gp/product/2916123113?ie=UTF8&tag=blogmaconniqu-21&linkCode=xm2&camp=1642&creativeASIN=2916123113

"... Telle est la fabuleuse série de grades, jamais publiée " en clair " à partir de l'autographe de 1766, qui constitue le corpus de ce livre. Ils sont à l'origine de certains des degrés les plus alchimiques du Rite écossais ancien & accepté, et surtout de tout un esprit de maçonnerie hermétique maintenant propre aux rites dits " égyptiens " de Memphis et de Misraïm. Mais surtout, ils sont une véritable clef pour la réalisation alchimique, comme le suggère l'importante préface de Jean Solis. Voici, en effet, une lecture qui intéresse autant le laboratoire que la dramaturgie maçonnique..."

Attached Image (viewed 974 times):

51wfdxTn93L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Last edited on Fri Apr 23rd, 2010 01:39 am by Paul Ferguson

adammclean
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 Posted: Thu Apr 22nd, 2010 10:57 pm
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Paul Ferguson wrote: There is also an 18th manuscript in the library of the French Grande Loge Nationale
This looks very interesting. I wonder if it would be possible to obtain some scans.
I have a book with a facsimile of a similar manuscript the Mutus Liber Latomorum which has an introduction by Didier Kahn.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Apr 23rd, 2010 12:29 pm
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adammclean wrote:
Paul Ferguson wrote: There is also an 18th manuscript in the library of the French Grande Loge Nationale
This looks very interesting. I wonder if it would be possible to obtain some scans.
I have a book with a facsimile of a similar manuscript the Mutus Liber Latomorum which has an introduction by Didier Kahn.


As befits a secret society their 'Information and Links' page is completely blank, but the Curator is François Geissmann, G.L.N.F., 12 rue Christine de Pisan. 75017 PARIS.

They seem to have some fabulous stuff. Look at this painting here by Louis Huet:

http://www.glnf-musee.fr/matrice.asp?ARB_N_ID=33&COL_N_ID=221&collection=Sc%E8ne%20ma%E7onnique,%20tableau%20de%20Louis%20Huet


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