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Lexikon des Mittelalters
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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Tue Jan 12th, 2010 09:15 am
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Does anyone here have access to the Lexikon des Mittelalters? I would welcome a summary of the article on Johannes Augustinus Pantheus by J. Telle.


Gratias vobis in antecessum ago, docti amici
Paul

Tom Willard
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 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2010 12:01 pm
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Paul, I can check the entry within the next twelve hours. Please let me know if you already have a response.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2010 01:50 pm
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Hi Tom,

No other replies so far. I would be very grateful if you would check the entry for me. I imagine it's quite brief. I have some evidence that Panteo was defrocked and I would be especially interested to see whether that is mentioned.

No rush over this.

Many thanks again,

Paul

Tom Willard
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 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2010 08:52 pm
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I have scanned the entry, on page 1659 of volume 3 (1993). As you will see, Telle says simply that Pantheus "lived as a priest and refiner of gold." He is thus more cautious than Ferguson, whom he cites.

Attached Image (viewed 332 times):

pantheus.jpeg

Tom Willard
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 Posted: Wed Jan 13th, 2010 08:58 pm
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Correction: Volume 6 (1993).

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu Jan 14th, 2010 08:26 am
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Very useful Tom. I am deeply grateful - thank you,

Paul

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Jan 15th, 2010 12:11 pm
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What is the "Alchemicamasse" referred to here six lines from the end? Surely not Melchior's "Processus sub forma missae"?

Paul

Tom Willard
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 04:59 am
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No, surely not the alchemical mass. (That would be Messe, in any case.) But since Masse can mean mixture, and since the "Voarchadumia" promises information on proportions (proportionibus) perhaps the reference is to the proper process or product of the work.

Ferguson dates the "Voarchadumia" Venice, 1550, the same year as the "Rosarium Philosophorum" was printed in Frankfurt. That seems to give the Italians equal claim to having the first printed book of alchemy.

Tom Willard
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 05:07 am
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Oops. Telle's entry got me thinking in German, but the point remains. Latin "massa" also means "mass." Cassell's gives Classical precedents for its use with metals.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 07:56 am
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Thanks Tom.

Actually Panteo's first book was the Institutiones, now lost, published before 1518. Then came the Ars et Theoria Transmutationis Metallicae published in 1518, on which the Voarchadumia (first edition Venice 1530 - Ferguson's 1550 reference is to the first French edition) was based, so he was indeed a pioneer.

Panteo can also claim to be the first person to publish an illustration in a printed book of a wire-drawing machine (1530) and make the first rapprochement in print between alchemy and the Cabala (1518). He would also seem to be first alchemical writer to discuss the harmony of the spheres, and the only one to do so before Michael Maier. So all in all a very important writer and well worth translating.

My translation is basically finished and I'm writing the introduction, which must needs be fairly extensive(!)

Should be ready to go to print first week of February.

Thanks again for your help.

Last edited on Sat Jan 16th, 2010 09:41 am by Paul Ferguson

Tom Willard
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 10:59 am
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Good work, Paul. That sounds very interesting.

Rafal T. Prinke
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 05:08 pm
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Paul Ferguson wrote:My translation is basically finished and I'm writing the introduction, which must needs be fairly extensive(!)

Should be ready to go to print first week of February.

Looking forward to it. I have just remembered a section of the 1550 edition in the Ars et theoria part is dedicated to a "Gulielmo Hyeroski, Polono viro nobiliss." whom I once tried to identify. Although I was not successful, I found one Batłomiej (Bartholomew) Hierowski -- a standard variant spelling of the rather rare surname, living c.1565-1612, who was a town physician of Toruń (Thorn), and dealing with alchemy. He studied medicine in Wittenberg (1592, doctorate 1593) and in 1595 published two works on heaaling wounds. Because he was born in Toruń and got City Council scholarship for his studies, it is pretty certain that Wilhelm Hierowski must have been his relative.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 06:57 pm
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Dear Rafal,

Many thanks for that. I see Bartholomew H. is in Wiki:

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bart%C5%82omiej_Hierowski

I did get one hit for Wilhelm Hierowski on Google Books, but there's no view:

http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&safe=off&rlz=1C1GGLS_enJE353JE353&q=%22Wilhelm%20Hierowski%22&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wp

"Katalog re̜kopisów Ośrodka Dokumentacji Wielkopolskiego Środowiska Literackiego: Sygnatury DL/1-DL/139 Archiwum Oddziału Poznańskiego Zwia̜zku Literatów Polskich."

Might be a wild goose chase though - possibly a more recent person with the same name...

Rafal T. Prinke
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 08:06 pm
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Hi Paul,

I should have checked Wikipedia -- but it says the same. I have used the first source it quotes: Polski słownik biograficzny (Polish biographical dictionary). The second source is derivative from that.

I doubt Katalog re̜kopisów...may have something on that Wilhelm, as it is a catalogue of manuscripts of contemporary literature and there was a literary critic Zdzisław Hierowski. But I may check it when I go to a library next time.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sat Jan 16th, 2010 08:10 pm
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Is Hierowski a Jewish surname?

Paul


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