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Alchemy discussion forum > Request for information > Help required > Bonacina again: Gabricus and Beya

Bonacina again: Gabricus and Beya
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Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sat Dec 27th, 2008 05:16 pm
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Gabricus and Beya are the royal brother and sister mentioned in the "Visio Arislei", apparently a translation of the Arabic "Risalat madd al-ba hr dhat al-ru'ya", which was itself a translation from the Greek of Archelaos. As a symbol of the conjunctio CG Jung made use of it in his "Psychology and Alchemy" and elsewhere.

Bonacina refers to this legend, but calls the sister Weia (presumably pronounced Vehya) and not Beya (see below). Does anyone have any suggestions as to why Bonacina should have adopted this variant spelling?

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Weia.jpg

Last edited on Sat Dec 27th, 2008 05:34 pm by Paul Ferguson

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Sun Dec 28th, 2008 09:54 pm
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Incidentally, a room at the castle in Moravská Třebová, where Bonacina worked as personal physician and astrologer to Ladislav Welen von Zerotein, has now been rigged out as "Master Bonacina's Alchemical Laboratory":

http://www.zamekmoravskatrebova.cz/index.php?id=16

Does not look entirely serious...

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Neil J Mann
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 Posted: Fri Feb 6th, 2009 12:17 pm
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Do we have any idea what Bonacina's direct source might have been? B and V have been somewhat liable to interchange in Spanish, and a few of the variations have solidified so that the Duke of Alba is known in England as the Duke of Alva for instance. A translation of the Arabic made in Spain might well turn Beia into Veia, but this is pure speculation.

Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Fri Feb 6th, 2009 12:44 pm
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Neil J Mann wrote:
Do we have any idea what Bonacina's direct source might have been? B and V have been somewhat liable to interchange in Spanish, and a few of the variations have solidified so that the Duke of Alba is known in England as the Duke of Alva for instance. A translation of the Arabic made in Spain might well turn Beia into Veia, but this is pure speculation.


Yes, the Spanish call it 'betacismo'. I am not aware of any translations of the Visio into Spanish or Catalan (the latter would be the more likely of the two). Maybe Adam can confirm this.

Having completed the translation I get the impression that Bonacina was far from his books and may have been working from his (not entirely reliable) memory.

Paul

adammclean
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 Posted: Thu May 6th, 2010 01:16 pm
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A correspondent wrote to me today on this matter :


Concerning the b and the v-question on your forum (Alva or Alba, Beya or Veya): In Spanish 'b' (be larga) and 'v' (be corta) are pronounced exactly alike. Which may be the cause of different interpretations.



Paul Ferguson
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 Posted: Thu May 6th, 2010 06:19 pm
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adammclean wrote:
A correspondent wrote to me today on this matter :


Concerning the b and the v-question on your forum (Alva or Alba, Beya or Veya): In Spanish 'b' (be larga) and 'v' (be corta) are pronounced exactly alike. Which may be the cause of different interpretations.





Sees to go back a long way and to occur in other languages:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betacismo
http://www.raco.cat/index.php/Faventia/article/viewFile/50150/55554


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